The Revenge of Analog

Read This Book: ‘The Revenge of Analog’ by David Sax [Book Review]


I’ve spent my entire professional career selling digital products online. For the last sixteen years I’ve disrupted (some would say decimated) a good portion of one of the oldest publishing industries in the world: sheet music.

When I started at Musicnotes.com as a lowly marketing assistant back in 2000, the concept of buying online had gained some traction … but the idea of buying a digital, virtual, item was still completely foreign to the general consumer. Keep in mind that this was before iTunes had even launched. Apple didn’t introduce us to the concept of buying digital music until January of 2001. Amazon didn’t even launch its Kindle e-Reader until 2007.

As technology evolved and people became much more accustomed to the concept of buying a digital item online, the world changed. I was a cheerleader of the benefits of digital distribution. In the sheet music industry, like many others, it solved a ridiculous amount of problems … such as print inventory, delivery logistics, cost of physical goods, lead times to print, how big a print run would be and even the very process behind which decisions were made as to if a product was financially feasible to even exist.
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Connected Car

Prepare for the Era of the Obsolete, Worthless Car


If you’ve read my blog, heard me talk or follow me online in any way, one thing you know about me is that I love technology. The other thing you might know is that while I always look for opportunities hidden behind the doors technology opens, I also try to be a realist (if not a critic).

This is why we really need to talk about this whole concept of the “connected car.”

Out at CES this past week there was a ton of cool stuff announced (and a lot of not cool stuff too). And, once you get past all the talk of VR, AR and digital assistants like Echo, the other big continuing trend was that of the connected car. From features like payment systems built into the dash through fully automated driverless tech, it really does look like the automotive industry is prepared to go all-in with tech innovation and disruption.
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VR, AR and the Inherent Challenge to Promoting What Must Be Experienced


This past holiday season, one of the hottest tech trends I saw being promoted on TV was Samsung’s swing at VR: their Gear VR headset. The commercials were on pretty constantly (at least on the programming I watched) … but there was one big problem with them. There’s no way to really show the VR experience in an ad.

It’s a challenge both Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) marketers are going to have to figure out how to surmount in order to get the kind of widespread adoption the technologies need to survive. But with all our ways of marketing, pretty much none of them can get across what the actual experience is. Sure, you could write an article “explaining it” in words or you could show a picture or video of what the person might be seeing on-screen … but I just don’t see how those are going to get the job done.
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The Future Isn’t Wearables, It’s Integrations


As 2016 came to a close, one tech trend was extremely clear: wearables aren’t catching on. In particular, smart watches are seeing a definite death-spiral. In October, Microsoft killed its Band, Motorola put a hold on any new 360 watches, Pebble got bought up by FitBit (but their watches are dead) and even Apple Watch is seeing unimpressive numbers (though they did see a boost in December, likely due to the hole in the market left by Pebble).

But then there’s Snap’s “Spectacles” – which saw a huge success at launch. So maybe wearables aren’t dead after all? Of course there’s always the chance they’ll die off just as quickly, now that all the early adopters have gotten theirs (or at least once they do get them – they’re sold out).

So then what’s the deal with wearables? Are they dead or not?
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